diptyque JUILLET 2017
diptyque JUILLET 2017

From his past, the domain in normandie,  this childwood free,  colors'seasons, larges landscap, nearly wild,

RUFFI DE PONTEVES paint and keep all this part of him, sensible and free, pure..

 

2017-Acrylique-2m./1m.H
2017-Acrylique-2m./1m.H

 

A number of artists have chosen to express themselves through gesture.

For them, it’s the energy that counts :

 

hunger for life!

 

By Ileana Cornéa, art critic at Artension

In the 1970s, painter Georges Mathieu invented the aesthetics of speed. Gesture? It is body language alignedwith the laws of painting, which are the laws of nature, the laws of the subconscious. It’s all connected. Increating “drippings” and presenting the emergence of new spaces to the world, Pollock was dancing.

It is with pleasure that we support a young lyrical abstract painter such as Ruffi!

He has inherited Matisse’s joie de vivre, and the pleasure of combining colours. From Johan Michelle, he has taken a taste for improvisation. In these dark times in which the best young figurative painters paint monsters, mass graves and apocalyptic visions reflecting the world around us, seeing so much optimism and energy inspring-like colours vivifies our senses.



He has always painted. He feels free, he paints dynamically and with determination. The evanescent art of writing, the Mallarmean spirit of hidden meanings – his predecessor, American artist Cy Twombly integrated these within painting. RdP  falls within the tradition of gestural artists, expressing his individual emotions with Proustian refinement.

In his best paintings, there is nothing to understand, but everything to take and receive. His paintings ripple like Mozart’s lively music, because all is harmonious. His graphic tricks let us see what we want to see: Bacchi, landscapes, rivers, a constantly evolving natural world. Creating and not copying: is that not the artist’s mission?



Dyptique -Janvier 2017 - 2m/1m.h
Dyptique -Janvier 2017 - 2m/1m.h

Lines dance, curve, rebel and intensify like small red, orange or green fits of rage. Acidulous colours, spring colours full of sap, ready to burst. In his grey diptych, the shades are amassed in murky tensions, like a sullensubconscious, then disperse, soften and fade like smoke gradually disappearing from view. The artist paints with aristocratic neutrality and with the passion of a young tenor. “The painting is played like a solo,” wrote George Mathieu in 1973, “[...] the mobilisation of all mental powers in one supreme celebration, the desire to forget oneself and simply be, the establishment of a secondary state, an ecstasy, a delirium.”